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Top Political Parties In The United Kingdom

  1. Conservative Party -

The Conservative Party has a middle right position in UK's legislative issues. The gathering earned the most significant number of seats in the House of Commons at the last election in 2015 and is along these lines the gathering that shaped the legislature. The gathering's seat is Theresa May who is right now the UK's Prime Minister. Among the important perspectives of the gathering is the conviction that free markets notwithstanding singular accomplishment drive monetary development. The gathering advocates for supply-side economics, a hypothesis which stipulates that decreased income tax triggers GDP development and consequently sums to the equivalent or more income gathered by the legislature from the lesser taxes on the extra growth. This hypothesis is in accordance with the gathering's support for tax breaks. The Conservative Party has built up a wide scope of worldwide unions incorporating ties with the US. Different perspectives of the gathering are confinements on exchange association, a robust national guard, financial conservatism, and deregulation.

  1. Labor Party- 

The Labor Party possesses a middle left position in UK's legislative issues. In the wake of collecting 231 seats in the 2015 elections, the Labor Party accepted the place of the Official Opposition. Jeremy Corbyn is right now filling in as the gathering's seat. The gathering at first supported communist arrangements including the redistribution of riches, confidence in openly subsidized training and human services, government intercession, and open responsibility for businesses. The Labor Party started grasping a few free-market approaches in the mid-1980s under the authority of Neil Kinnock, Tony Blair, and John Smith. The gathering's present political stand has been portrayed as 'Third Way.'

  1. Scottish National Party -

The Scottish National Party is the third-biggest in the UK as far as participation. The gathering has most of the seats in the Scottish Parliament just as most of the delegates in the Parliament of the UK. The gathering is at present under the authority of Nicola Sturgeon. The Scottish National Party is related with Scottish Nationalism, and it has been at the front line in fomenting for Scottish autonomy. Being a social law based gathering, a portion of its perspectives incorporate interests in sustainable power source, development of moderate social lodging, dynamic individual tax assessment, same-sex marriage, and government-financed advanced education.

  1. Liberal Democrats- 
 

In 1988, the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party converged into the Liberal Democrats. Tim Farron is the gathering's present head. The Liberal Democrats advocate for fundamental freedoms, discretionary and sacred change, environmentalism, dynamic tax assessment, European reconciliation, sedate decriminalization, and human rights laws.

  1. Developing Trends -

The UK's two gathering framework which is ruled by the Conservative and Labor Parties has been diminishing in fame. Littler gatherings have been enrolling expanding bolster, for example, the Scottish National Party which is pushing for Scottish freedom. Another upcoming gathering is the Green Party of England and Wales just as the Green Party in Northern Ireland. The Green Party advocates for harmony and peacefulness, original cognizance, social equity, and grassroots majority rules system. The UK Independence Party has earned help because of its positions on British Nationalism, Economic radicalism, migration, and exit from the EU.

Truth of Tory Britain

The Inconvenient Truth of Tory Britain

Credit where credit is due. The Tories are an election winning machine. They have reduced their former coalition partners, the Lib Dems to a parliamentary rump,...
polling station

General Election preview: Sheffield Hallam

For the fourth in our series focusing on constituencies to watch during the general election, we take a look at the Deputy Prime Minister’s seat Three constituency...
Nigel Dodds MP

Week 11: Hero – Nigel Dodds MP

The Democratic Unionist Party’s deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, receives our Hero of the Week award If, seven days ago, you had suggested that the DUP...
day mail

Week 47: Villain – The Daily Mail

This week’s villain award goes to the Daily Mail for publishing a cartoon of refugees as potential terrorists crossing into the EU with rats. The...

Economic Updates

Info Insight

political
Having been inspired by Charlie East-West’s post of the great Jimmy Reid’s speech from 1972,   Neil Kinnock’s famous words in the days before Margaret Thatcher’s landslide victory in the 1983 General Election came to mind.  It is hard to think of any other end to a speech that proved to be so prescient and which has such relevance to the economic destruction and  Class...
day mail
This week’s villain award goes to the Daily Mail for publishing a cartoon of refugees as potential terrorists crossing into the EU with rats. The imagery within this cartoon is both disturbing and disgusting. Refugees as vermin? Rifles being carried on their backs? For fuck’s sake. This goes way beyond gutter journalism. This cartoon has a whiff of fascism and a...

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General Election preview: Sheffield Hallam

polling station
For the fourth in our series focusing on constituencies to watch during the general election, we take a look...

Great Political Speeches #2: Neil Kinnock’s Warning

political
Having been inspired by Charlie East-West’s post of the great Jimmy Reid’s speech from 1972,   Neil Kinnock’s famous words in...

The Inconvenient Truth of Tory Britain

Truth of Tory Britain
Credit where credit is due. The Tories are an election winning machine. They have reduced their former coalition partners,...

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Great Political Speeches #2: Neil Kinnock’s Warning

political
Having been inspired by Charlie East-West’s post of the great Jimmy Reid’s speech from 1972,   Neil Kinnock’s famous words in the days before Margaret Thatcher’s landslide victory in the 1983 General Election came to mind.  It is hard to think of any other end to a speech that proved to be so prescient and which has such relevance to the economic destruction and  Class War declared by the current Coaliton government. ‘If Margaret Thatcher wins on Thursday, I warn you not to be ordinary; I warn you not to be young; I warn you not to fall ill; And I warn you not to grow old’ It brings a tear to my eye, every time I hear it.  We have truly learned nothing.

Week 47: Villain – The Daily Mail

day mail
This week’s villain award goes to the Daily Mail for publishing a cartoon of refugees as potential terrorists crossing into the EU with rats. The imagery within this cartoon is both disturbing and disgusting. Refugees as vermin? Rifles being carried on their backs? For fuck’s sake. This goes way beyond gutter journalism. This cartoon has a whiff of fascism and a stench of Nazi propaganda framed within a post Paris attacks landscape. It is one of the most dispicable cartoons ever published in a mainstream media outlet in this country. The Daily Mail masquerades as a “quality” newspaper but it is the worst of the worst within our mainstream media. The Daily Mail is nothing more than a nasty xenophobic outlet for the sort of “British values” that should never ever be endorsed or promoted within our society. But, sadly, there will be more than a few Daily Mail readers who will lap this sort of fear & loathing up and actually agree with the messaging applied within this cartoon. This sort of bile is dangerous. It feeds ignorance. It creates division. It creates schisms in our society. It breeds a “them & us” mentality that engineers the sort of divisive values that move our country back to the dark ages of open discrimination against anything or anyone who appears to be a misplaced threat to a blinkered, narrow minded, small island mentality. Everything that is wrong in our society can be viewed within the pages of the Daily Mail. Shame on them. In terms of our media, they are the worst of the worst.

Week 11: Hero – Nigel Dodds MP

Nigel Dodds MP
The Democratic Unionist Party’s deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, receives our Hero of the Week award If, seven days ago, you had suggested that the DUP might win our hero award, we would have probably laughed in your face. What a difference a week makes. On Wednesday, Nigel Dodds set out his party’s preconditions for support for a government if May’s general election resulted in a hung Parliament. None of his original three demands would be a redline for a Labour-led government (although a fourth added later for a European referendum, would cause more difficulty) but one was for the Conservatives: the abolition of the Bedroom Tax. As I explained on Friday, it is not even as if the Bedroom Tax (and just calling it that is enough to set Tories teeth on edge) even currently applies to Northern Ireland. The consequence of the DUP’s precondition on this is that unless the Conservatives and the Lib Dems can muster a majority between themselves, it looks likely that the Bedroom Tax is dead. UKIP, which will probably have fewer MPs than the DUP and would certainly be a less welcome partner to Cameron, has already set out its opposition to the Bedroom Tax, albeit in less strident tones than the DUP. But besides the policy implications, there is something admirable about a small party setting out very clearly what its negotiating stance will be before the election starts. The DUP are being very principled in setting this all out before the campaign proper starts. There is of course some self interest in this for Dodds: fear of the Bedroom Tax being imposed on his poor North Belfast constituency as part of further austerity could be politically toxic for him. But the odds now are against the Bedroom Tax surviving are now lengthening: even if Cameron holds on, it may well only be through ditching it. And for striking this blow against the Bedroom Tax, Nigel Dodds deserves our thanks.

General Election preview: Sheffield Hallam

polling station
For the fourth in our series focusing on constituencies to watch during the general election, we take a look at the Deputy Prime Minister’s seat Three constituency polls over the last year have shown Labour beating Nick Clegg in his Sheffield Hallam constituency. Back in May, former Lib Dem Lord Oakeshott commissioned a poll by ICM that gave Labour a nine point lead. In November, Tory polling guru Lord Ashcroft’s poll by Survation initially showed a small lead for Clegg, but having re-checked the figures more recently, this poll too gave Labour a lead, albeit a smaller one of three percent. Finally, Survation carried out another poll in the seat last month for Unite, giving Labour a ten percent lead. Below is a graph showing all the polls in Hallam since the general election.   The constituency Instinctively, this sounds surprising: Clegg had almost a 30% majority in 2010, the constituency has never returned a Labour MP and Labour has been in third in every general election since 1983.   Sheffield Hallam takes in the western side of the city, as it climbs up the slopes of the Pennines. About half the seat is actually in the Peak District national park, although the vast majority of voters live in the suburban western fringe of the city itself. Those suburbs include Crookes, Crosspool, Dore, Ecclesall, Fulwood, Loxley, Millhouses, Stannington and Topley. Outlying Pennine villages include High Bradfield, Dungworth, Ringinglow and Worrall, scattered amongst the river valleys that flow into the River Don further east in the city. Not all the seat was traditionally Hallamshire, the county within a county that once covered most of what is now within Sheffield’s boundaries. Dore and Totley to the south were part of Derbyshire until 1934. Loxley deserves a special mention – traditionally, Robin of Locksley (i.e. Robin Hood) was born in this village that has long since been absorbed within the city.   Sheffield Hallam is far from the highrise towers and former steelmills of the Steel City. Whilst not all the seat is not rich – parts of Crookes and Stannington are certainly not wealthy – overall Sheffield Hallam is one of the most affluent constituencies outside of the South East and it has the 70th highest median income of the 650 in the country – that is wealthier than Tunbridge Wells or David Cameron’s Witney. It has the lowest level of child poverty of any constituency in the land. It is certainly one of the most highly educated seats in the nation: 60% of those of working age have a degree – that’s more than Cambridge. In 2001, the constituency had more people classified as professionals of any in the UK. What about the students? A lot of the Liberal Democrats’ success here since 1997 has been put down to the student vote. Whilst there is a fairly large student population (18% of adults are in fulltime education) and Crookes ward in particular has plenty of houses let out to students, this is less than before the 2010 boundary changes. Those changes removed Broomhill ward, which includes the main campus of the University of Sheffield, and replaced it with Stannington ward to the north. Now, it is Sheffield Central next door that is the student hotbed: 39% of adults there are in fulltime education. The Liberal Democrats certainly needed student votes to win the seat for Richard Allan in 1997 and to secure Clegg’s first election in 2005. But they are probably equally glad that it is no longer quite the factor there that it used to be now that student votes tend to be a lot less favourable for them. Even with the loss of those student numbers in 2010, Clegg’s victory was emphatic: 53.4% of the vote, with the Conservatives (who dominated the seat until 1997) thirty points behind and Labour on a mere 16%.   Since 2010 Unsurprisingly, every one of the constituency’s fifteen councillors in 2010 was a Liberal Democrat. Given their national polling decline, what is more surprising is that thirteen of them still are: all the councillors have now stood for election since then. Four of the five wards still only have Liberal Democrats, whilst Crookes ward (the most urban) has two Labour councillors but still elected a Liberal Democrat one in 2012.   Labour comes reasonably close in one other ward, Stannington to the north. In fact, they only fell five votes short of victory in 2011. But they are a long way further back in Ecclesall and Fulwood wards, getting about half the Liberal Democrat vote in the latter. They are even further behind in Dore and Totley ward, where they are still in third place behind the Conservatives. The Tories still have a strong showing there, Sheffield’s wealthiest and the last ward to have Conservative councillors, although that was some time ago now. In 2012, they came 7% behind the Liberal Democrats. The map below shows the relative strength of Labour and Liberal Democrats, averaged across the 2011, 2012 and 2014 local elections.   This suggests the Liberal Democrats still have a commanding position. But are there any signs of a decline in support more recently? The graph below shows the percentage local election results, aggregated for the five wards. Labour’s best result against the Liberal Democrats was back in 2011, and their support locally has fallen since. The Liberal Democrat level of support has actually been pretty static across the three local elections at 38-39 percent of the vote, although this is a drop from the 52% they achieved in the local elections held on the same day as Clegg’s 2010 general election victory. The most significant drop in support has been for the Conservatives: their support has halved since 2011. At the same time, UKIP’s support has doubled between 2012 and 2014, although this may reflect the fact that the latter election took place on the same day as the European elections.   Those polls These local results seem to be at odds with the polls predicting Labour victory. The Oakeshott poll took place only a few weeks before the 2014 local election results. So, could the results be wrong? After the 1992 general election result, red-faced pollsters had to change their methodology due to their missing of “shy Tories”. When I posted a few days agoweek about Scottish polls, I suggested that the polls might be having some difficulty in correctly identifying “shy Labour” voters there, just as they had in identifying shy No voters in the referendum. There is some evidence that this may also be the case with Liberal Democrat support: that is one of the reasons why most polls of late (particularly YouGov) show them on single figures but ICM polls always put them in the low double digits. This is because most polls exclude “don’t knows” from their figures but ICM’s methodology show these as supporting the party they voted for last time around. There is of course a slight problem with this coming home to the roost assumption – some Lib Dem voters in 2010 may now be undecided on who they will vote for in three months, but some of those will already have decided that it won’t be them again. But for the rest, it is probably a fairly reasonable assumption. The real Liberal Democrat level of support is probably somewhere between the YouGov and ICM positions. All of the three polls showing a Labour lead exclude undecided voters (even the Lord Oakeshott one carried out by ICM themselves). But the data behind the poll does show how those “don’t knows” voted in 2010. So what happens if we take an ICM-style approach to these Hallam voters? The methodology below is not precise: all the figures used below remove the pollsters’ weightings, although those weightings in fact have a relatively minor impact on the headline figures. So, let us have a look first at that Oakeshott poll. The graph below shows the numbers of identified voters for each party in the darker colour at the bottom of each column. Above that, in the lighter colour, are the undecided voters shown as returning to the party that they voted for in 2010.   Those figures are certainly worse for Clegg than the Liberal Democrat councillors achieved three weeks later, but not enough to remove him from Parliament. A similar picture emerges looking at the Ashcroft results:   Note: the unweighted identified support varies from the headline figures due to the weighting issue. It might therefore be that the Liberal Democrat lead is greater once the undecideds are added in if the same weighting was applied. Finally, looking at the Survation/ Unite poll, there are again more undecided voters that were previously Liberal Democrat than for other parties. This shows the parties neck and neck, rather than a ten-point Labour lead.   Conclusion The local election results show that, whilst Liberal Democrat support has fallen since 2010, they are still the dominant party at a council level. Whilst the polls suggest that Clegg may be less popular in his constituency than his party, they may not really be as disasterous as the headline figures show. Given the affluence of the seat and the reduced (if still important) influence of the student vote, there does not appear to be a particularly strong narrative for why voters who still pick the Lib Dems locally would abandon their party leader in the massive numbers needed for a Labour victory. So, with some regret, my prediction is that Nick Clegg looks likely to continue to be Hallam’s MP.

The Inconvenient Truth of Tory Britain

Truth of Tory Britain
Credit where credit is due. The Tories are an election winning machine. They have reduced their former coalition partners, the Lib Dems to a parliamentary rump, and they have reduced UKIP to the margins and they have reduced Labour to infighting and potential civil war. But that is as far as I am willing to lavish praise on the Tories. The Tories won the election on false premises. They did not win the election because of their magnificently successful governance of the country. They won the election because they hoodwinked people into thinking a number of perceived wisdoms that were total nonsense. Millions of voters think that the Tories are better at managing the economy than Labour, and that Labour recklessly “spent all of the money“. Millions of people think that the deficit and debt have spiralled out of control because of excessive welfare and public sector costs. Millions of people think that the country has turned a corner and that the economy is back on track. Millions of people think that immigration is a threat. Millions of people think that the Tories can be trusted with our national security. Well, Tory voters – this is utter bullshit. Here are a 10 inconvienent truths about Tory Britain today: 1. Labour managed the economy better than the Tories. Labour’s handling of the economy between 1997-2010 was largely prudent and successful. They even managed to run at a surplus for a number of years. Under the Brown administration, the deficit and debt spiked upwards due to the colossal £1.2trillion bail out of the banks. 2. The Tories are mishandling the economy. Since 2010, the national debt has almost doubled to £1.5 trillion. The Tories don’t even have the excuse of being forced to bail out the banks – which Labour did in 2008/2009. 3. The Tories are destroying the finances of the NHS. Since the Tories came into power in 2010, the NHS has gone from a healthy annual surplus to a deficit. This can be attributed largely because of the false economy reforms within the 2011 Health Care Act which has created huge financial resources being spent on agency staff, NHS staff redundancy pay outs and prohibitive private sector fees for services such as catering, pharmaceuticals and equipment. 4. The real economy isn’t booming. It is flatlining. This chart produced by EU/Eurostats brutally highlights the haves and have nots society in Britain today. Inner London (propped up by the slush funds washing around The City of London) is the most prosperous area in Northern Europe while within the wider reaches of our country, Britain now has the 8 poorest regions in Northern Europe. 5. Corbyn-led Labour doesn’t present a “threat” to our national security. The Tories present a threat to our national security. The Tories continue to intervene in the Middle East by dropping bombs on innocent civilians in Libya and Syria while stoking up even more hated in a crisis ridden war zone. £100bn Trident renewal is a key defence priority for the Tories. A price tag that could pay for every single nurse in the country receiving a 10% pay rise. Meanwhile despite this quasi ego-fuelled imperialistic policy in defence and foreign affairs, we have a government pimping itself out as an arms dealer. Britain’s arms trade is £multi-million industry producing and depositing weapons in some of the most dangerous areas in the world and into the hands of some of the most dispicable regimes in the world. 6. Immigration has benefited Britain. The vast majority of immigrants come to Britain for the right reasons – to escape tyranny, oppression and with the noble ambition of bettering themselves through aspiration and employment. 7. The banks caused the financial mess and caused the spike in the national debt, not over inflated public services. Did public sector workers cause a financial crash, receive a £1.2 billion bail out, receive billions in bonuses and evade their tax payments? No. I don’t remember that either. 8. Austerity is a con. The austerity con: the Tory idea that we cut our public services in order to pay back a never-ending debt to bankers who we’ve already had to bail out anyway. Total bank bail out = £1.2 trillion. Labour didn’t “spend all the money” – the banks did. 9. Benefit “scroungers” aren’t the problem. Tax evasion scroungers are the problem. £1.2 billion is lost in bogus benefit claims per year. £120 billion is lost in tax evasion and avoidance per year. The lost revenue numbers are x10 higher within tax evasion losses. Clawing back as much as possible within this area would have a much greater effect at balancing the books than demonising benefit claimants. 10. The Tories are not capturing the centre ground. They are moving the centre ground to the extreme right. If the centre ground involves the Bedroom Tax, Foodbanks, Trident, 4 million kids in poverty, zero hours contracts, fracking, slashing tax credits, demolishing public services, bombing the Middle East, tax cuts for millionnaires and cutting disability allowance – then we need this country to reject the centre ground. The inconvenient truth (which many voters are either ignoring or not getting access to the right information to critically challenge the Tories) is that under the Tories, the economy is in a dangerous place, poverty is rising, the wrong subjects are being demonised and victimised and meanwhile, the individuals who helped get us into this horrible mess remain untouchable. Welcome to Tory Britain. The Tories may win elections, but their credentials in doing so are complete bullshit.

Top Political Parties In The United Kingdom

  1. Conservative Party –

The Conservative Party has a middle right position in UK’s legislative issues. The gathering earned the most significant number of seats in the House of Commons at the last election in 2015 and is along these lines the gathering that shaped the legislature. The gathering’s seat is Theresa May who is right now the UK’s Prime Minister. Among the important perspectives of the gathering is the conviction that free markets notwithstanding singular accomplishment drive monetary development. The gathering advocates for supply-side economics, a hypothesis which stipulates that decreased income tax triggers GDP development and consequently sums to the equivalent or more income gathered by the legislature from the lesser taxes on the extra growth. This hypothesis is in accordance with the gathering’s support for tax breaks. The Conservative Party has built up a wide scope of worldwide unions incorporating ties with the US. Different perspectives of the gathering are confinements on exchange association, a robust national guard, financial conservatism, and deregulation.

  1. Labor Party- 

The Labor Party possesses a middle left position in UK’s legislative issues. In the wake of collecting 231 seats in the 2015 elections, the Labor Party accepted the place of the Official Opposition. Jeremy Corbyn is right now filling in as the gathering’s seat. The gathering at first supported communist arrangements including the redistribution of riches, confidence in openly subsidized training and human services, government intercession, and open responsibility for businesses. The Labor Party started grasping a few free-market approaches in the mid-1980s under the authority of Neil Kinnock, Tony Blair, and John Smith. The gathering’s present political stand has been portrayed as ‘Third Way.’

  1. Scottish National Party –

The Scottish National Party is the third-biggest in the UK as far as participation. The gathering has most of the seats in the Scottish Parliament just as most of the delegates in the Parliament of the UK. The gathering is at present under the authority of Nicola Sturgeon. The Scottish National Party is related with Scottish Nationalism, and it has been at the front line in fomenting for Scottish autonomy. Being a social law based gathering, a portion of its perspectives incorporate interests in sustainable power source, development of moderate social lodging, dynamic individual tax assessment, same-sex marriage, and government-financed advanced education.

  1. Liberal Democrats- 
 

In 1988, the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party converged into the Liberal Democrats. Tim Farron is the gathering’s present head. The Liberal Democrats advocate for fundamental freedoms, discretionary and sacred change, environmentalism, dynamic tax assessment, European reconciliation, sedate decriminalization, and human rights laws.

  1. Developing Trends –

The UK’s two gathering framework which is ruled by the Conservative and Labor Parties has been diminishing in fame. Littler gatherings have been enrolling expanding bolster, for example, the Scottish National Party which is pushing for Scottish freedom. Another upcoming gathering is the Green Party of England and Wales just as the Green Party in Northern Ireland. The Green Party advocates for harmony and peacefulness, original cognizance, social equity, and grassroots majority rules system. The UK Independence Party has earned help because of its positions on British Nationalism, Economic radicalism, migration, and exit from the EU.